"An unaccompanied child migrant was the first person in line on opening day of the new immigration station at Ellis Island. Her name was Annie Moore, and that day, January 1, 1892, happened to be her 15th birthday. She had traveled with her two little brothers from Cork County, Ireland, and when they walked off the gangplank, she was awarded a certificate and a $10 gold coin for being the first to register. Today, a statue of Annie stands on the island, a testament to the courage of millions of children who passed through those same doors, often traveling without an older family member to help them along."

Child Migrants Have Been Coming to America Alone Since Ellis Island | Mother Jones

How To Beat Your Neighbors

theyearofelan:

You can pick your friends. You can pick your job. You can pick your religion.  But you can’t really pick your neighbors. 

Neighbors are a terrible thing from hell. 

This is a really negative way to think. You shouldn’t think of your neighbors as enemies or as bad people. You should think of them as what they really are:

ANIMALS.

And when an animal gets out of hand you don’t call the police. You just outsmart them.

My neighbor Gary is a real piece of shit. His favorite thing to do on Saturday mornings is to open his garage door at 7am, play some weird country music, and spend 2 hours dragging all of his used garbage out onto his lawn for an impromptu yard sale. Old sweatshirts, crappy vinyl records that nobody wants, and toys his three dumb-looking kids got tired of playing with.

Sure, everyone has a yard sale now and again. But every Saturday? Not cool, Gary. He rarely seems to sell anything, anyway. I think he’s just bored. But it’s tremendously annoying. People drive slowly on our street and he talks loudly with them on his lawn. It’s really unbearable.

I’ve asked Gary on 4 separate occasions to limit his yard sales to once a month. I’ve even offered to help him set up a table and put out signs. He told me he would consider it, but he hasn’t stopped. Last Saturday he told me to “put a sock in it.” 

Okay, Gary. I’ll put a sock in it.

On Tuesday I knocked on Gary’s door and told him I was sorry I had bothered him about the yard sales but in doing so I had noticed he was parking his car on the street instead of in his garage. I told Gary that I was buying a second car and I wanted a place to store it and asked if he would be willing to rent me his garage. I offered him $250 a month and I even offered to pay 6 months up front if he agreed to let me keep it for a year. He asked for $300 and we settled at $275. 

I had never seen Gary happier. Not only had I “put a sock in it” but I was even now paying him to rent his garage. What a loser I am!

This morning at 7am Gary started collecting all of his house garbage on the lawn to sell to passerby. Another yard sale? Oh, joy! 


Well, today, Gary had a very special customer: Me.

I asked Gary how much money he thought he would get if he sold all of the things he had out. He told me everything was worth about $75.

I offered him $100 for everything. It’s Gary’s lucky day! He gladly accepted my offer and asked me if I wanted help getting everything into my house.

What a kind offer. He helped me put everything in paper bags and then asked me if I needed help carrying them. It was like 20 bags! I politely declined and pulled his garage door clicker out of my pocket. I opened his garage door and, bag by bag, put all the things that used to clutter his garage back into his garage.

"Where are you going to put your car?" asked Gary.

"Oh, I decided not to get another car," I said. "I’m just going to use this place to store all the crap I don’t want. Have a nice day, Gary."

I closed the garage door and walked back to my house. 

Right now, Gary is probably still on his lawn, without anything to sell, and a garage full of trash. He won’t be alone for long though. I’m doing laundry now, so later today I’m going to go back over to my rented garage and “put a sock in it.”

Have a great day, Gary.

Is this real life? I want it to be real life.

Confession: I own a pretty decent grill.

But I never use it because I am afraid of blowing myself up or getting third degree burns.

"

“I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe!” Eric Garner, 43, repeatedly screamed after at least five NYPD officers took him down in front of a Tompkinsville beauty supply store when he balked at being handcuffed.

Within moments Garner, a married father of six children with two grandchildren, stopped struggling and appeared to be unconscious as police called paramedics to the scene. An angry crowd gathered, some recording with smartphones.

“When I kissed my husband this morning, I never thought it would be for the last time,” Garner’s wife, Esaw, told the Daily News.

She got no details from police until after she had gone to the hospital to identify his body, she said.

"

Staten Island man dies after NYPD cop puts him in chokehold — SEE THE VIDEO - NY Daily News

And the thing is that if he were white, he’d still be alive.

Mom's Medical Fund on Fundly

fivecentwisdom:

msleahhrhhbic:

thesnarkyschoolteacher:

watchjuliateach:

I can’t just let my mom sit in bed and cry about this.  She needs to be resting and focusing on using that new knee, not crying because she doesn’t know how she’s going to pay for all of it.

Every little bit helps.  If you can’t afford to donate, please reblog.  

I haven’t posted this on Facebook because I know she’ll be upset that I’m asking others for money.  She’s always one that gives help, not asks for it.  If we’re Facebook friends, please try to keep it off.  I know that’s a weird request, but I don’t want to hurt her pride.

Educhums, time to pull together. Consider giving to this wonderful lady’s cause.. Every little bit helps! Good luck, Julia!

When my mom was sick, so many of my follows reached out to help. I’m glad I can finally start to pay it forward. ♡

Boosting!

Gaza, Ctd.

letterstomycountry:

This war will only end when Hamas either stops shooting rockets into Israel, or runs out of rockets, whichever comes first. Also, if Hamas doesn’t want a hospital to be bombed, then stop shooting rockets from the hospital!

This is a very common response directed towards people who criticize Israel’s use of force in the Occupied Territories.  I think it is unpersuasive, for the following reasons.

  1. The logic being employed here looks a lot like victim-blaming.  The IDF, to its credit, in what seems to be an acknowledgment that not every single person living in Palestine is a terrorist, called the Director of the Hospital and told him to evacuate the building.  But this probably means that militant Hamas members who may have been occupying the building would also have evacuated it as well.  Will this deny them a base of operations?  Perhaps.  But only temporarily.  Hamas is waging something akin to a guerrilla war against Israel.  History suggests that the militant wing of Hamas will find other places to go, and  the rockets will not in fact stop.  So in the end, all that was likely achieved by the hospital strike was that a vital civilian resource—a hospital—was destroyed.

  2. Hamas may not care if a hospital gets bombed, but the patients who rely on that hospital probably do.  Not every Palestinian living in Gaza supports Hamas, but the Israeli military often behaves as if this were true.  Some claim that Hamas forces civilians to act as human shields.  But if that’s true, then those civilians are unwilling participants in the violence.  They are therefore still “innocent,” and however despicable this tactic may be on the part of Hamas, it is equally despicable to carry out military strikes in disregard for these peoples’ lives.  This idea that the residents of Gaza are all expendable in the fight against Hamas is morally objectionable.  To risk an analogy, few people would agree that it’s ok to shoot through a hostage to kill their captor.  But that is precisely what the Israeli military does every time it bombs civilian infrastructure in Gaza, and then justifies civilian deaths by claiming that Hamas is forcing civilians to be “human shields.”

  3. As I’ve said many times on this blog, the reason why Hamas has the degree of political influence they have is because the Israeli government actively empowers them through its policies in the Occupied Territories.  Gaza and the West Bank are open-air prisons.  Freedom of movement, commerce, and expression is restricted in numerous ways by the Israeli Government in a manner which most reasonable people would view as intolerable.  To take one example: A former U.S. diplomat once noted in a leaked cable that the policy of the Israeli Government is to “keep the Gazan economy on the brink of collapse without quite pushing it over the edge,” and to keep the Palestinian economy "functioning at the lowest level possible consistent with avoiding a humanitarian crisis."  Dov Weisglass, a former senior Israeli official, put it this way: “The idea is to put the Palestinians on a diet, but not to make them die of hunger.”  It should come as no surprise that at least a portion of the Palestinians living in the Occupied Territories have become so frustrated and angry by the mistreatment they receive at the hands of the Israeli government that they take up arms to violently resist.  Which  brings me to my next point…

  4. What is it that keeps the rockets coming?  Ostensibly, there are two primary reasons: the first is that some members of Hamas views Israel as an illegitimate state and will never accept its right to exist under any circumstances.  There is little, if anything that Israel can do to change this.  However, another reason why these rockets keep coming is that it remains one of the few accessible ways that residents of the Occupied Territories have to fight back against an occupying force—one they view as the source of their oppression.  When that oppression ends, support for Hamas will dry up considerably.  And—I humbly submit—the number of rockets being fired into Israel will also shrink considerably.

  5. Whether the Israeli government likes it or not, this is a guerrilla war.  The Israeli government has blown up hospitals before.  It has blown up schools before.  It has blown up homes before.  Yet the rockets always keep coming.  They keep coming in part because the IDF can’t be everywhere all the time.  But mostly they keep coming because residents of the Occupied Territories find a new reason to legitimate Hamas’s violence every time another Palestinian house, business, or family gets blown to pieces by an Israeli bomb.  

With all this being said, the greatest impetus for rocket fire into Israel, in my opinion, is the Israeli government’s ongoing military occupation of Gaza and the West Bank.  The Israeli government’s policies toward the residents of these areas generate resentment, anger, and hatred in those affected by them. As a result, a portion of the Palestinian population is invariably radicalized by the trauma of enduring the Israeli government’s policies, and they come to view violent resistance as reasonable.  This violent resistance is in turn empowered by foreign sponsors who sympathize with the plight of the Palestinian people (e.g. Iran, Hezbollah).

That’s why the rockets won’t stop coming until Israel ends the Occupation.  Militants will always find ways to commit violence against Israel.  The only true way to stop these attacks is to remove the impetus for them.  That impetus is, for the most part, the Occupation.  The Occupation is the lifeblood of Palestinian resentment towards Israel.  It is the Occupation that radicalizes the Palestinian population.  It is the Occupation that empowers militants through the sympathy of foreign sponsors.  And it is the Occupation that continues to put the lives of Israelis in danger every day.

One final note: it bears mention that I’m not suggesting that ending the Occupation will mean Israel never suffers another terrorist attack.  What I am suggesting is that Israel’s policies in the Occupied Territories are a large motivator for those attacks, and changing those policies would reduce the number of rocket attacks considerably.  It would also deprive Hamas of political legitimacy, because ending the Occupation robs Hamas of most of their talking points.  This would deprive Hamas of political power, which would reduce their ability to finance their militant wing.  That means less rocket attacks, and a safer Israel.

halftheskymovement:


Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department. This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men. There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.

halftheskymovement:

Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department. This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men. 

There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.