Posts tagged Science

gjmueller:

Exposing Kids To 10 Hours Of Science A Year Makes Them Smarter

Low-income minority fourth-graders from south L.A. improved their test scores in math and language after they got just a handful of science lessons, a new study found. College students studying science presented 10 separate one-hour lessons, and the kids rose up whole percentile ranks in other subjects.
“A lot of students say things like, ‘I didn’t know science was fun,’” said Samantha Gizerian, now a clinical assistant professor at Washington State University. Apparently they also showed a greater interest in taking books home to read, and a greater willingness to practice math. The lessons were simple, too—in one case, a college student just brought in some microscope slides from his lab.

photo via flickr:CC | jds-emma

gjmueller:

Exposing Kids To 10 Hours Of Science A Year Makes Them Smarter

Low-income minority fourth-graders from south L.A. improved their test scores in math and language after they got just a handful of science lessons, a new study found. College students studying science presented 10 separate one-hour lessons, and the kids rose up whole percentile ranks in other subjects.

“A lot of students say things like, ‘I didn’t know science was fun,’” said Samantha Gizerian, now a clinical assistant professor at Washington State University. Apparently they also showed a greater interest in taking books home to read, and a greater willingness to practice math. The lessons were simple, too—in one case, a college student just brought in some microscope slides from his lab.

photo via flickr:CC | jds-emma

publicradiointernational:

Fifteen-year-old Jack Andraka is a fan of “Glee” and likes to kayak. He’s also the mind behind a new pancreatic cancer test that is 168 times faster than anything else in the field. In May, Jack won $75,000 at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for his test.
He is currently working on getting this test patented. More.
(Photo: Jack Andraka, via sciencenewsforkids.org)

Awesome!

publicradiointernational:

Fifteen-year-old Jack Andraka is a fan of “Glee” and likes to kayak. He’s also the mind behind a new pancreatic cancer test that is 168 times faster than anything else in the field. In May, Jack won $75,000 at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for his test.

He is currently working on getting this test patented. More.

(Photo: Jack Andraka, via sciencenewsforkids.org)

Awesome!

jtotheizzoe:

“Hmm, maybe I should do a web show …”
… said Bill Nye, thinkaliciously. Well, it sounds like he got his wish.
According to the most recent episode of the Nerdist Podcast, with Bill as guest, he is bringing The Science Guy back to life on the Nerdist YouTube channel!
Did you hear me? Bill Nye is coming back! Rejoice, all!
*cough*needasidekick?*cough*
(photo by Derek Heisler)

jtotheizzoe:

“Hmm, maybe I should do a web show …”

… said Bill Nye, thinkaliciously. Well, it sounds like he got his wish.

According to the most recent episode of the Nerdist Podcast, with Bill as guest, he is bringing The Science Guy back to life on the Nerdist YouTube channel!

Did you hear me? Bill Nye is coming back! Rejoice, all!

*cough*needasidekick?*cough*

(photo by Derek Heisler)

New Scientist: Google Earth lets you explore the ocean’s depths

Jules Verne, eat your heart out. Anyone with a computer and an internet connection can now explore a portion of the seafloor larger than North America thanks to a collaboration between Google and oceanographers at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Scientists have mapped roughly 10 per cent of the ocean floor and half that data is now publicly available via Google Earth. Scenic highlights include the Hudson Canyon off New York City, the Pacific Ocean’s Lamont seamounts - underwater mountains typically
formed by extinct volcanoes and the 3000-metre-high Mendocino Ridge off the US Pacific Coast, which might harbor massive plumes of methane. 

(Click the link to continue reading)

NPR: Henrietta Lacks Receives Honorary Degree

Henrietta Lacks was a poor African-American woman with cervical cancer. Doctors took her cells without her knowledge and used them for research. And they’ve been used in tens of thousands of research studies. Now nearly 60 years after her death, Morgan State University in Baltimore has awarded her an honorary degree. Michele Norris and Robert Siegel have more.

I remember seeing a special about her on t.v. where they also talked to some of her relatives.  I wish I could remember what show it was on.

There’s a book on her and what her cells have done for science and our health — and the racism her life and story has felt.  It is called the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  I’ve been wanting to read it, but just haven’t gotten to it yet.

kbkonnected:

Super cool science site just added to my “Sensational Science Sites” LiveBinder. Planet Science has terrific interactives, games, quizzes, amazing facts and more. Students will enjoy discovering all this site has to offer. I alway find something new and engaging.
Make sure you check out the “Smoothie Maker”. It could also lead to a great writing lesson. The new feature “Body Bits Pinball” was also fun and informative. I also really liked “Meet your Match” where students can learn about careers in science and meet men and women in these professions.
Planet Science has lots to offer students (PreK-8) and is advertisement free!
Via @prlowe91 Great to follow on Twitter!

kbkonnected:

Super cool science site just added to my “Sensational Science Sites” LiveBinder. Planet Science has terrific interactives, games, quizzes, amazing facts and more. Students will enjoy discovering all this site has to offer. I alway find something new and engaging.

Make sure you check out the “Smoothie Maker”. It could also lead to a great writing lesson. The new feature “Body Bits Pinball” was also fun and informative. I also really liked “Meet your Match” where students can learn about careers in science and meet men and women in these professions.

Planet Science has lots to offer students (PreK-8) and is advertisement free!

Via @prlowe91 Great to follow on Twitter!

Google: Google Science Fair seeks budding Einsteins and Curies

To help make today’s young scientists the rock stars of tomorrow, in partnership with CERN, The LEGO Group, National Geographic and Scientific American, we’re introducing the first global online science competition: the Google Science Fair. It’s open to students around the world who are between the ages of 13-18. All you need is access to a computer, the Internet and a web browser.

You may have participated in local or regional science fairs where you had to be in the same physical space to compete with kids in your area. Now any student with an idea can participate from anywhere, and share their idea with the world. You build and submit your project—either by yourself or in a team of up to three—entirely online. Students in India (or Israel or Ireland) will be able to compete with students in Canada (or Cambodia or Costa Rica) for prizes including once-in-a-lifetime experiences (like a trip to the Galapagos Islands with a National Geographic Explorer), scholarships and real-life work opportunities (like a five-day trip to CERN in Switzerland). And if you’re entering a science fair locally, please feel free to post that project online with Google Science Fair, too!