Posts tagged prek

Tips for setting up your Pre-K classroom at the beginning of the year:

1. Use picture labels for where things go along with the words.  This makes teaching the kids to clean-up so much easier.

2. Don’t go overboard with posters and cutesy stuff on the walls.  It is much better to leave room for student work.  Most districts follow a 20% rule with how much can be on the walls.  When you consider the bulletin boards and other things you have to have up that doesn’t leave a lot.

3. Don’t put markers out the first week.

4. Begin with board books in the reading center.  This gives you time to go over how to take care of books before the books get bent or ripped.

5. Have a quiet area where kids that are over-stimulated or scared can go.  I keep some squeeze balls, fun books, etc there.

6. At parent orientation or the first few days take pictures of the kids.  Use these to put the kids’ pictures with their names on their cubbies.  Do the same on name plates so that the kids can find their names quickly to copy.

7.  Don’t begin with all your jobs.  Start with 3-5.  Add a couple the next week.  The kids that did it week one can help the kids doing it week 2 learn what to do.

8.  Keep parent phone numbers easily accessible by your phone.

9.  Do not put out all the play food yet.  I start with the pots and pans, plates, and cups.

10.  Puzzles are great, but expect that however many you put out is the number that they will dump on the floor the first week and get stuck!  Keep simple puzzles out for week one.

This is for me personally.  My students have never been in a day care center or anything like that.  So I have to spend time teaching them how we play, how we use our things, and how we clean up.

My pre-kers have nap time at school.  Except none of them ever want to take naps and do everything they can to stay awake.  I always tell them, “You’re going to miss the days you could take naps.  I would give anything to take a nap right now!  So take a nap for me!”

My pre-kers have nap time at school.  Except none of them ever want to take naps and do everything they can to stay awake.  I always tell them, “You’re going to miss the days you could take naps.  I would give anything to take a nap right now!  So take a nap for me!”

I found this through a link on Pinterest, and just HAD to share!
DIY Puffy Paint: 

Squeeze bottles for the paint: I used 6oz. bottle from Wilton (you can get these in the chocolate making section of any craft store…I found mine at Jo Ann Fabrics they were about $2 for 2 bottles)- Flour- Salt- Water- Coloring: You can use tempera paint (wet or dry), food coloring or natural coloring agents such as beet juice, raspberry or blueberry juice reduction, etc. For mine, I used Wilton’s gel food coloring because they already come in almost any color imaginable (plus I already had them in my cabinets and I loved the concept of keeping everything non-toxic - or edible - too! You just never know…kids are crazy)!- Glass/Plastic bowls- Spoons/Whisks- Funnel: optional…but it helps with getting the paints into the squeeze bottles

I found this through a link on Pinterest, and just HAD to share!

DIY Puffy Paint: 

Squeeze bottles for the paint: I used 6oz. bottle from Wilton (you can get these in the chocolate making section of any craft store…I found mine at Jo Ann Fabrics they were about $2 for 2 bottles)
- Flour
- Salt
- Water
- Coloring: You can use tempera paint (wet or dry), food coloring or natural coloring agents such as beet juice, raspberry or blueberry juice reduction, etc. For mine, I used Wilton’s gel food coloring because they already come in almost any color imaginable (plus I already had them in my cabinets and I loved the concept of keeping everything non-toxic - or edible - too! You just never know…kids are crazy)!
- Glass/Plastic bowls
- Spoons/Whisks
- Funnel: optional…but it helps with getting the paints into the squeeze bottles

Preschool benefits last into adulthood, study says

Better jobs, less drug abuse and fewer arrests are among advantages found in the study that tracked more than 1,000 low-income, mostly black Chicago kids for up to 25 years.
  • 80 percent of the preschool group finished high school versus 75 percent of the others
  • Nearly 15 percent of the preschool group attended a four-year college, versus 11 percent of the others
  • 28 percent of the preschool group had skilled jobs requiring post-high school training versus 21 percent of the others
  • Average annual adult income for the preschool group was about $11,600 versus $10,800 for the others. The low average incomes include zero earnings for those in prison and close to that for adults who were still in college or studying elsewhere.
  • 14 percent of the preschool group had abused drugs in adulthood versus 19 percent of the others
  • 48 percent of the preschool group had been arrested in adulthood and 15 percent had been incarcerated, versus 54 percent of the others arrested and 21 percent incarcerated.