Posts tagged reading

Rules: Reblog with your top 3 book recommendations of any genre. Don’t delete previous recommendations.

Mine are: 

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff by Christopher Moore

The Agony of Alice by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Night by Elie Wiesel

(I left out the obvious Jane Austen / Harry Potter recs.)

gjmueller:

Exposing Kids To 10 Hours Of Science A Year Makes Them Smarter

Low-income minority fourth-graders from south L.A. improved their test scores in math and language after they got just a handful of science lessons, a new study found. College students studying science presented 10 separate one-hour lessons, and the kids rose up whole percentile ranks in other subjects.
“A lot of students say things like, ‘I didn’t know science was fun,’” said Samantha Gizerian, now a clinical assistant professor at Washington State University. Apparently they also showed a greater interest in taking books home to read, and a greater willingness to practice math. The lessons were simple, too—in one case, a college student just brought in some microscope slides from his lab.

photo via flickr:CC | jds-emma

gjmueller:

Exposing Kids To 10 Hours Of Science A Year Makes Them Smarter

Low-income minority fourth-graders from south L.A. improved their test scores in math and language after they got just a handful of science lessons, a new study found. College students studying science presented 10 separate one-hour lessons, and the kids rose up whole percentile ranks in other subjects.

“A lot of students say things like, ‘I didn’t know science was fun,’” said Samantha Gizerian, now a clinical assistant professor at Washington State University. Apparently they also showed a greater interest in taking books home to read, and a greater willingness to practice math. The lessons were simple, too—in one case, a college student just brought in some microscope slides from his lab.

photo via flickr:CC | jds-emma

What Kids Are Reading 2012 Edition

lhuddles:

I stumbled across What Kids Are Reading: The Book-Reading Habits of Students from my NCTE inbox email. It’s actually pretty interesting!

Authors who have commentary in the document include Barry Gilmore, Jeff Kinney, David Coleman, Dan Gutman, Ellen Hopkins, Terri Kirk, Dav Pilkey, and Sandra Stotsky.

This document begins of lists of what kids are reading, separated by grade level.

Starting on page 42 are some exemplars for Common Core texts. 

There is a section for librarians’ picks separated by grades and interest level.

There is also a list of frequently challenged books in 2008, 2009, and 2010.

I’d say if you’re looking for summer reading to stay on par with what your kids are reading, this pdf is a wonderful place to begin!

StoryLine Online: Have Celebrities Read Favorite Children's Books

This site is presented by the Screen Actor’s Guild Foundation.  It streams videos with SAG members reading children’s books.  Some of the stories include Harry the Dirty Dog, To Be a Dog, Thank You Mr. Faulker, Stellaluna, A Bad Case of Stripes, The Polar Express, and Enemy Pie (Others are featured).  Some of the SAG members are Al Gore, Haylie Duff, Betty White, and Amanda Bynes.  Heck — I just might need a bedtime story tonight!

Suite 101: Reading Benefits Reading

Poor Reading – Less Reading – No Reading

The combination of deficient decoding skills, lack of practice and difficult materials results in unrewarding reading experiences that lead to less involvement in reading related activities. Thus, a situation coined “The Matthew Effect” often occurs – the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

Advantages of Reading

In other words, those with poor reading skills do not want to read and, therefore, their reading does not improve. Contrarily, those who can read fluently read more and benefit from all the other advantages that reading offers. For example, developing automatic word recognition, general language skills, vocabulary, familiarity with complex syntactic structures and improving background knowledge.


Reading Enriches Vocabulary Not Speech

Since words found in print tend to be less common, a person’s vocabulary develops due to language exposure through reading not through oral language. Spoken language tends to be repetitive and, therefore, full of high frequency words. In contrast, less frequent words, which are still important for daily functioning, tend to be found in print and not in spoken language. As a result, speech is lexically impoverished compared to written language.

Low Frequency Words in Children’s Books

Interestingly, words in children’s books are considerably rarer than those used in speech in prime-time adult television. In addition, magazines have about three times as many opportunities for new word learning than prime-time TV and adult conversation. Hence, conversation is not a substitute for reading and does not enhance vocabulary growth.


(Click to continue reading)

On Reciprocal Teaching

I mentioned I used Reciprocal Teaching with my third graders recently, and someone commented that they’d like to hear more about it.  I first learned about it in my grad courses on literacy.  The Reading Teacher published by the International Association for Reading has published a few articles on its use.  If you are a member you can search the archives, or if you are a college student I know a lot of college libraries have access to full text articles.  Here are some of the ones that discuss it that I know of:

They also published a book called Reciprocal Teaching At Work: Strategies for Improving Reading which is on sale for $6.95 for members and non-members alike (I have not read it, so I don’t know if is worthy purchase).

Reading Rockets provides a good overview of how Reciprocal Teaching works here.

My students are already familiar with some of the 4 comprehension skills (predicting, summarizing, questioning, and clarifying) but I still slowly introduce each skill.  For my younger students, I play a character for each skill as I introduce it.  For example, when introducing the clarifying skill, I am a detective with a magnifying glass and my dad’s detective-looking hat.  I explain my job as (whatever skill we are doing), why it is important, and how it helps people to understand what they read.  I do a lot of read-alouds and modeling in small groups, and then the role is passed on to a student.  I have cards for each skill posted in my room with prompts that say things like: I wonder why…   I predict that …  This passage is about…, etc.  I also have smaller versions of these cards that I hand out to students before a page is read so they know that they are responsible for that role at that time.  Eventually, the students naturally do all the skills and their comprehension improves.

Hope this is of some help!