Posts tagged teachers

Meet the Teacher Who Inspired Darren Aronofsky's 'Noah'

The most popular guest at the Paramount Pictures premiere of “Noah” on Wednesday night in New York was decked out in a bright pink ensemble with matching boots.

Vera Fried, who admitted that her wardrobe came from a Suits for Less discount store, isn’t a trained actress. She’s Darren Aronofsky’s former seventh-grade teacher.

The director of “Noah” contacted his old instructor three decades later to thank her. “She inspired me in the seventh grade to become a writer,” Aronfosky told Variety. “She said, when you write your first book, dedicate it to me.” And he did: there’s a inscription to Fried in his “Noah” coffee table book.

Fried, who is now retired in Delray Beach, Florida, from a lifetime of teaching in Coney Island, N.Y., said she wasn’t familiar with Aronofsky’s work when he reached out.

“I didn’t hear from him for 33 years, and then he sent me the unpunctuated email,” Fried says, noting that the teenage Aronofsky used to punctuate perfectly.

I watched an interview with this guy, and in describing how he was inspired as a 7th grader, he said it was because he had “a magical teacher.”  So, he gave her a part in the movie.

"When public schools are judged by how much art and music they have, by how many science experiments their students perform, by how much time they leave for recess and play, and by how much food they grow rather than how many tests they administer, then I will be confident that we are preparing our students for a future where they will be creative participants and makers of history rather than obedient drones for the ruling economic elite."

Mark Naison, Fordham professor and social justice activist (via socialismartnature)

"Teachers who are sensitive to their students and who openly share their enthusiasm for learning and their belief in their students’ abilities can help buffer low-SES kids from the many risks and stressors they experience in their lives."

Teaching with Poverty in Mind by Eric Jensen, pg 88

Crooks and Liars: Conservative husband apologizes to his wife, a teacher after he voted for Kasich.

Dear Honey,

I’m sorry.

I am a conservative husband, belong to the Tea Party and I voted for John Kasich. I have been married to a Cleveland teacher for almost 14 years and my vote let her down.

I apologize:

For letting people tease you about having the summer off and not asking them to thank you for the tough days ahead that begin in early August. I know for a fact you work more hours in those 10 months than many people do in 12. All those hours are earned.

For complaining that my Sunday is limited with you because you must work.

For making you think you have to ask permission to buy a student socks, gloves and hats.

For not understanding that you walk through a metal detector for work.

For leaving dirty dishes in the sink [when you awoke] for your 4 a.m. work session. I should know you have to prepare.

For thinking you took advantage of the taxpayers. Our governor continues to live off the taxpayer dole, not you.

For counting the time and money you spend to buy school supplies.

For not saying “thank you” enough for making the world and me better.

I love you.

CNN: Why America's teachers are enraged

The uprising in Madison is symptomatic of a simmering rage among the nation’s teachers. They have grown angry and demoralized over the past two years as attacks on their profession escalated.

The much-publicized film “Waiting for Superman” made the specious claim that “bad teachers” caused low student test scores. A Newsweek cover last yearproposed that the key to saving American education was firing bad teachers.

Teachers across the nation reacted with alarm when the leaders of the Central Falls district in Rhode Island threatened to fire the entire staff of the small town’s only high school. What got their attention was that Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and President Obama thought this was a fine idea, even though no one at the high school had been evaluated.

The Obama administration’s Race to the Top program intensified the demonizing of teachers, because it encouraged states to evaluate teachers in relation to student scores. There are many reasons why students do well or poorly on tests, and teachers felt they were being unfairly blamed when students got low scores, while the crucial role of families and the students themselves was overlooked.

Teachers’ despair deepened last August when The Los Angeles Times rated 6,000 teachers in Los Angeles as effective or ineffective, based on their students’ test scores, and posted these ratings online. Testing experts warn that such ratings are likely to be both inaccurate and unstable, but the Times stood by its analysis.

Now conservative governors and mayors want to abolish teachers’ right to due process, their seniority, and — in some states — their collective bargaining rights. Right-to-work states do not have higher scores than states with strong unions. Actually, the states with the highest performance on national tests are Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Vermont, and New Hampshire, where teachers belong to unions that bargain collectively for their members.

This is an article worth your time.  Please click the link to read the entire article.